Wake Audubon Blog

Lumber River birding in June

i Jul 29th No Comments by

authored by Erik Thomas

On June 15, I conducted some bird counts at the Lumber River Important Bird Area (IBA), which the Wake Audubon Society monitors.  Counting consists of stopping for ten minutes at designated spots and making a record of all birds seen or heard.  All of the sites in the Lumber River IBA are wetland habitats. This time, however, I decided to do something a little different.  I counted at six of the designated sites along Ashpole Swamp, which parallels the South Carolina border a few miles away, and six other spots at nearby upland sites that are not designated locations.

The contrast in birdlife between the bottomland sites and the upland sites was striking.  Down in the bottomlands, birds of wooded swamps were plentiful.  I heard Yellow-billed Cuckoos at several sites, Red-shouldered Hawks at a few, and various kinds of woodpeckers.  Blue-gray Gnatcatchers were easy to find, and I heard—but only occasionally saw—quite a few Carolina Wrens and some Acadian Flycatchers.  Prothonotary Warblers, Northern Parulas, and Yellow-throated Warblers were actively defending territories.  Here and there a White-eyed Vireo chattered.  There was even a flock of Wood Storks passing overhead.

Northern Parula. Photo by Ed Schneider

Northern Parula. Photo by Ed Schneider

Yellow-throated Warbler. Photo by Chris Wood Glamor

Yellow-throated Warbler. Photo by Chris Wood Glamor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just up the hill from the swamp, however, the birds changed dramatically. Three members of the icterid family—the Eastern Meadowlark, Orchard Oriole, and Red-winged Blackbird—appeared there.  Indigo Buntings were singing at several spots, and Northern Mockingbirds guarded yards throughout.  Mourning Doves sat on power lines or flew by nearly everywhere.  Cattle Egrets were attending a group of steers at one site and a Chipping Sparrow was singing heartily at another.  Most impressively, a congregation of Mississippi Kites—I counted nine, but there may have been more—was sailing over some fields.

Indigo Bunting at Yates Mill Park. Photo by Bob Oberfelder.

Indigo Bunting at Yates Mill Park. Photo by Bob Oberfelder.

Eastern Meadowlark

Eastern Meadowlark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’d like to see more details, I’ve uploaded all the counts I did to eBird. One additional sighting I had was a series of realtor signs in Ashpole Swamp.  It seems that most of the swamp is for sale.  It’s too wet to develop for housing (fortunately!), but logging interests may want to pounce on it.  It would be desirable if the state or an environmental organization could acquire this valuable and extensive habitat, perhaps to be added to Lumber River State Park at some future date.

 

–Erik Thomas

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